AUTHORS
& Abstracts

THE RECEPTION OF GEORGE BERNARD SHAW IN THE CONTEXT OF THE FEMALE WOMAN STAR SYSTEM: THE CASE OF PYGMALION

Vania Papanikolaou

Abstract: ‘Pygmalion’ is probably the most well-known play by George Bernard Shaw. It was written in 1913 and from its very first performance in April 1914, it received critical acclaim by audience and critics alike. However, it was not until the 1930s that the Greek audience got to meet phonology professor Henry Higgins and get acquainted with the story of his relationship with the wandering flower girl, Eliza Doolittle. The present paper studies the ‘romantic comedy’ and its performances in Greece from the 1930s to the end of the 20th Century. Why was this London comedy so beguiling to actors, troupe managers and audiences? How different are the Greek adaptations compared to other European ones? How did Eliza Doolittle’s role contribute to the emergence of female star-system?

Keywords: George Bernard Shaw, Greek Theatre, Reception, 20th Century, Female Star-System

Vania Papanikolaou
Department of Theater Studies, University of Patras
Greece
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